Marie Kondo... But Make it Sustainable | Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans

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Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans

Top: J.Crew (old, similar here) || Bottoms: H&M (similar here)|| Accessories: Kate Spade necklace (old, similar here), Madewell Small Transport tote || Shoes: Nisolo

Every Spring, without fail, I go through my apartment and embark on a massive Spring Cleaning spree. By the end of the week, I tend to have big piles of clothes, junk, and papers that I need to get rid of. I know I’m not alone, and in fact, I’ve read that since Marie Kondo’s new Netflix show came out, more homes have been tidied than ever before. While I obviously think this is a good thing, it made me think about how to clean up your home sustainably. Believe it or not, there are a lot of things that charities won’t take when it comes to your clothing donation. In fact, only 10-20% of the clothes that get donated actually end up in thrift shops with the remaining 80-90% either getting resold or dumped in a landfill. It really made me rethink my methods for donating my box o’ crap to Goodwill. If you’re in a Spring Cleaning mood yourself, here are a few tips on how to do so without hurting the environment.



Sell What You Can

Last night I put up my very first Poshmark listing! After using the site to buy clothes sustainably for a while, I took the plunge to be a seller too! This is not only better for the environment, you can make money from what you were planning on getting rid of anyway. If there are pieces that you don’t wear anymore but seems a waste to just get rid of, I’d recommend selling it on Poshmark or taking it to a consignment store to get it appraised. As a blogger, I had a TON of clothes I either wore once or twice for the blog. I’m trying to be a more mindful shopper after my year-long shopping ban but in the meantime, I’m having fun realizing what clothes I wear often and what I don’t.

Repurpose or Upcycle

I had some old ratty t-shirts I basically can’t even wear to the gym anymore. I decided to stitch them up to be used as rags or a reusable Swiffer cover (so I don’t have to keep buying disposable mop pads). I’ve had a friend take old fabrics from her clothes to use for card decoration. If you get creative, old clothes don’t have to be tossed. You can reuse them in a completely different way!


Related post: One Year Shopping Ban


Donate wisely

As I stated earlier, a lot of charity shops have high standards for the clothes you donate a a lot of it ends up in a landfill anyway. Use good judgement when it comes to putting clothes in that donate bin. Speaking of bins, I learned the hard way that those Planet Aid bins aren’t the best for the environment. Do yourself a favor and physically take your clothes to a Salvation Army. They’ll even give you the information to get a tax write-off for your donation so win-win!

Give to Friends and Family

The best way to be the most environmentally friendly is to give to your friends and family directly. Before I start listing clothes on Poshmark or taking them to Goodwill, I have friends come by and pick items they like. Granted, most of my friends are all different sizes, but they can all usually find something they like, such as a purse, or a lounging tee. Give your old clothes a renewed sense of purpose!



What are some of your tips to declutter sustainably? Tell me some of your tips in the comments!

Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans
Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans
Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans
Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans
Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans
Bow Sweater and Comfy Jeans